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Look It Up

If you've ever wondered whether animals could be ambidextrous, or what happens when you put a gun in a refrigerator, or what Presidents of the United States do after their terms end, this podcast will relieve you of the effort of having to look it up yourself. Look It Up is a podcast for the indiscriminately curious. Establish contact on twitter @liupodcast or by email at thelookituppodcast@gmail.com.
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Now displaying: 2016
Sep 13, 2016

Look It Up is a podcast for the indiscriminately curious. On this week's episode: why do I get so cold in a hammock? Which type of transport is safest per mile traveled? Where did the names for the days of the week come from?

 

Sources: transportation statistics from the NTSB and IIHS, bit.ly/liutransport1, bit.ly/liutransport2, and bit.ly/liutransport3. Weekday etymologies on Wikipedia, bit.ly/liuweekdays.

Aug 31, 2016

Look It Up is a podcast for the indiscriminately curious. On this episode: 

0:43 - What would gymnastics look like in low gravity? 

4:19 - What is data scaping?

5:52 - Shorts: does the third-party doctrine apply to iMessage? What happens if you drive over a road flare?

6:48 - Forfeitures, a segment about the weird stuff the US Government seizes

9:09 - Sources. NASA video about movement in space suits, bit.ly/liugravity. Scientific American article on lunar Olympic gymnastics, bit.ly/liugymnastics. SLU Law Journal article about iMessage and the third-party doctrine, bit.ly/liudoctrine. US Government forfeiture website, www.forfeiture.gov.

Today's episode featured a clip from Philippe Beer Gabel's "Cats in my mind" and "Mystical Picnic" by Nutmeg, all from the Free Music Archive, freemusicarchive.org

Keep in touch on twitter (@liupodcast), or email thelookituppodcast@gmail.com.

Aug 16, 2016

On this week's episode: what are closed cities? Is there anywhere in the US that's safe from natural disasters? What is rebar for and how is it made?

 

 

Contact the podcast at thelookituppodcast@gmail.com or on twitter at @liupodcast.

Jul 26, 2016

This week: what tone languages have to do with perfect pitch, how to tell if a number is divisible by 13 (or 17, 19, etc.), and the return of Forfeitures.

Jul 15, 2016

This week: why fumigation tents look like circus tents, how easy it is to break your sternum, and how to apply for a patent in the United States. 

Jun 14, 2016

This week: a history of grain silos, etymologies, and what'll happen when California runs out of license plate combinations. Also on this episode, shorts and a list of cool stuff seized by United States Customs and Border Protection officers. 

 

Sources: grain silos at bit.ly/liugrains and bit.ly/grains2; license plate article at bit.ly/liuplates; forfeiture lists at forfeiture.gov. 

 

Contact thelookituppodcast@gmail.com with any questions or comments! 

Jan 9, 2016

On this episode of Look It Up: were there marches in the 1500s? How do you type on a Japanese or Chinese keyboard? Is there a correlation between geographic location or political party and whether you say "an -" or "a historic?"

This, and more. Check it out. 

Links:

bit.ly/anhistoricspreadsheet: the data and results for an v. a historic
bit.ly/liu1500march: the YouTube video of the march we listened to 


Look us up on twitter @lookituppod, or email thelookituppodcast@gmail.com

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